Regulatory Update Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Update to the Refrigerant Management Requirements Under the Clean Air Act; Final Rule

Regulatory Update Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Update to the Refrigerant Management Requirements Under the Clean Air Act; Final Rule

The Clean Air Act prohibits the knowing release of ozone-depleting and substitute refrigerants during the course of maintaining, servicing, repairing, or disposing of appliances or industrial process refrigeration. The existing regulations require that persons maintaining, servicing, repairing, or disposing of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant observe certain service practices that reduce emissions of ozone-depleting refrigerant. This rule updates those existing requirements as well as extends them, as appropriate, to non-ozone depleting substitute refrigerants, such as hydrofluorocarbons. Updates include strengthened leak repair requirements, record keeping requirements for the disposal of appliances containing more than five and less than 50 pounds of refrigerant, revisions to the technician certification program, and revisions for improved readability and compliance. As a result, this action reduces emissions of ozone-depleting substances and gases with high global warming potentials. This final rule is effective on January 1, 2017.

Categories and entities potentially regulated by this action include those who own, operate, maintain, service, repair, recycle, or dispose of refrigeration and air-conditioning appliances and refrigerants. From Table 1 – Potentially Affected Entities: Owners or operators of air-conditioning equipment used in the following: hospitals, …

View Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-11-18/html/2016-24215.htm
EPA website: https://www.epa.gov/section608

Tools/Resources/Case Studies

  1. Case studies US Climate Resilience Toolkit (modified/added in November 2016)

    Hospital Plans Ahead for Power, Serves the Community Through Hurricane Sandy
    The combined heat and power system at Greenwich Hospital in Connecticut kept the lights on through Hurricane Sandy, and the system continues to support community resilience.
    View: https://toolkit.climate.gov/case-studies/hospital-plans-ahead-power-serves-community-through-hurricane-sandy

    Investment in Infrastructure at Sea-Level Hospital Will Pay Off by Reducing Risk
    Built very close to sea level, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston implemented innovative strategies to keep critical infrastructure and patient care above future flood levels.
    View: https://toolkit.climate.gov/case-studies/investment-infrastructure-sea-level-hospital-will-pay-reducing-risk

  2. 5 technologies that are making smart buildings smarter, 11/2/16
    http://www.constructiondive.com/news/5-technologies-that-are-making-smart-buildings-smarter/429582/
  3. Cracking the code for small hospital sustainability, 11/14/16
    http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/cracking-the-code-for-small-hospital-sustainability.html
  4. Designing A Disaster-Proof Hospital, 11/21/16
    Hospital design is evolving to withstand worsening storms and rising tides.
    https://www.fastcodesign.com/3065826/designing-a-disaster-proof-hospital
  5. Dartmouth General Hospital goes green, 11/17/16
    http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1416422-dartmouth-general-hospital-goes-green
  6. Adaptively Managing Green Roofs and Walls, 11/29/16
    https://sourceable.net/adaptively-managing-green-roofs-and-walls/